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Tintin in the Land of the Soviets
Tintin in the Congo
Tintin in America
Cigars of the Pharaoh
The Blue Lotus
The Broken Ear
The Black Island
King Ottokar's Sceptre
The Crab with the Golden Claws
The Shooting Star
The Secret of the Unicorn
Red Rackham's Treasure
The Seven Crystal Balls
Prisoners of the Sun
Land of Black Gold
Destination Moon
Explorers on the Moon
The Calculus Affair
The Red Sea Sharks
Tintin in Tibet
The Castafiore Emerald
Flight 714 to Sydney
Tintin and the Picaros
Tintin and Alph-Art

Tintin and the Picaros

The twenty-third episode in the series, Tintin and the Picaros (1976) is a Latin-American tale of a coup d’état, complete with hostage-taking and guerrilla warfare. Tintin returns to the country of San Theodoros, which he first visited in The Broken Ear (1937). Hergé’s story reveals the hypocrisy behind the apparently endless cycle of revolution and counter-revolution in South America. Tintin and the Picaros was the last book written by Hergé, and it took more than ten years to complete. As Hergé grew older readers had to wait longer and longer between each new adventure!

Tintin and the Picaros cover
Tintin and the Picaros
Tintin and the Picaros
Tintin and the Picaros
Tintin and the Picaros
Tintin and the Picaros
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Haddock renouncing whisky (thanks to an invention of Calculus!); Nestor spying at doors; Snowy supplanted by Moulinsart’s cat; Jolyon Wagg playing a positive role; Alcazar ridiculed by his wife, a virago of the worst kind: the evolution of Tintin’s world is more revolutionary than the abandonment of golf trousers for jeans!

Bearded book title

Tintin and the Picaros was initially going to be entitled Los Bigotoudos and then Tintin et les Bigotoudos, the word Bigotoudos coming from 'bigotudo' – moustache in Spanish.
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
“Tintin et les Bigotudos” - Detail of a sketch for a page published in Tintin magazine on 28 October 1975 - Pencil on drawing paper - 365 x 550 mm (entire picture) - Studios Hergé collection
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
“Tintin et les Bigotudos” - Strips from a pencilled page published in Tintin magazine on 7 October 1975 - Studios Hergé collection
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
“Tintin et les Bigotudos” - Detail from a pencilled page published in Tintin magazine - on 7 October 1975 -Studios Hergé collection
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
“Tintin et les Bigotudos” - Pose sketch for the last frame of a page published in Tintin magazine on 23 September 1975 - Studios Hergé collection

The first frame

For the first frame of the book Hergé had imagined a picturesque summer scene with blossoming trees. But he was able to count on the vigilance of the colourists who noticed a space-time error since the action was supposed to take place in February, carnival obliges!
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
Errare humanum est and the picture was corrected.
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021

A quantum shift in trousers

For the first time ever, in Tintin and the Picaros Tintin sheds his plus fours and we see the little reporter wearing brown flared jeans. Many readers reproached Hergé for this change in Tintin’s appearance - what was he thinking?!
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021

Tintin supports the CND

Tintin appears with a well-known logo on his helmet – the CND (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament) sign – which during the 60s came into widespread use as a symbol of peace and love. Wearing a CND sign would be surprising for a character with apparently conservative leanings, but then is Tintin really so conservative? And in any case, people change!
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
The CND sign was invented by British graphic designer Gerald Holtom, for a protest against a nuclear armament factory in 1958.

Poison

This story of Tintin and the Picaros is all about change. It looks like Captain Haddock has lost his taste for whisky, and he also seems to have calmed down a little. The Captain barely utters a single curse throughout the adventure – what on earth is going on?!
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021

Archibald: who would have guessed?

We had to wait until the twenty-third adventure in the series to discover Captain Haddock’s first name, which is mentioned during a surreal moment when Tintin reminds the disorientated Captain of his first name and surname.
Tintin - The Adventures of Tintin - Tintin and the Picaros
Search for a first name for Captain Haddock. © Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
Hergé wrote 17 first names down on a piece of paper, which is on display at the Hergé Museum. In the end he chose Archibald over Marmaduke.

Nestor: nobody is perfect

In Tintin and the Picaros we see a different side to Nestor, who is normally impeccably behaved. The straight-laced butler develops a taste for alcohol: like master like servant. Nestor also shows an indiscreet streak, secretly listening in on conversations, and is acutely embarrassed when caught in the act by Captain Haddock. This is the last time in The Adventures of Tintin that we see the butler from Marlinspike Hall, although a few sketches of Nestor do appear in Tintin and Alph-Art.
Tintin and the Picaros - Haddock and Nestor
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
Why did Hergé make him miss his exit?

Cats and dogs

Snowy senses an unacceptable intrusion into his territory. Has his master taken a shine to the cat at Marlinspike Hall?
Tintin and the Picaros - Snowy
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021 - All rights reserved
In this light perhaps the fact that Snowy still seems to have a weak spot for alcohol and drunken antics, can be forgiven.
Tintin and the Picaros - Snowy
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021 - All rights reserved

Mayan temple?

Tintin never travels to Mexico, but while sketching the pyramid in Tintin and the Picaros, Hergé drew inspiration from a Mayan pyramid found in Yucatan, South Mexico. The Mayan pyramid is called El Castillo de Kukulcan. Standing 30 metres tall, it towers over the vast Chichen Itza archaeological site.
Tintin and the Picaros - El Castillo de Kukulcan
El Castillo de Kukulcan
The last complete Tintin adventure unfolds in the imaginary South American state of San Theodoros. While Hergé based his made-up country on real life, the author completed the picture by using his imagination to fill the gaps in his knowledge.

The Jolly Follies

Hergé dreamed up a carnival troupe named the Jolly Follies. Hergé’s archives include photos and articles about carnival processions, and the author was partially inspired by the famous group of revellers, the orange-throwing Gilles of Binche.
Tintin and the Picaros - Jolly Follies
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
In real life, Fidel Castro also profited from carnival celebrations to launch an attack (26 July 1953) on the Moncada Barracks in Cuba, an event widely recognised as the beginning of the Cuban Revolution, which would finally topple the dictatorship of Batista in 1959. A final amusing detail about the Jolly Follies: a group called the Turlurons (Jolly Follies) has existed in Louvain-la-Neuve (the location of the Hergé Museum) since 1991!

A cameo role by a famous Gaul, among others

Characters disguised as Asterix (Goscinny and Uderzo would return the compliment when the Thom(p)sons appeared in Asterix and the Belgians), Snoopy, Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse, appear on pages 54, 59 and 60.
Tintin and the Picaros - Asterix - Mickey
© Hergé - Moulinsart 2021
5 reviews
or to write a review.
vahidesmi
2021/09/29 20:47 PM
in Persian:
تن‌تن و پیکاروها
cangrows
2021/07/18 16:54 PM
My dad promised me that he would buy it!
doctor14
2021/07/15 09:34 AM
Absolutely brilliant book! Love the Asterix reference! Read this one many many times and it is one of my favourites.
t0315523j
2021/06/13 15:12 PM
Tintin And The Picaros
devil123
2021/02/01 07:33 AM
The book Tintin and the picaros is wonderful and fantastic
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